Mission Arctic Blog

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15

Aug 2017

Ice Capades

Ice: glaciers, ice bergs, bergy bits, growlers, pack ice, mother nature’s awesome beauty and terrible power equally encapsulated in all these frozen incarnations of water. We have been both mesmerized, awestruck and giddy with excitement at the ice’s pure beauty, and at the same time threatened by its awesome power. Early in our trip, sailing up the coast of Greenland whether through ice berg alley or up Greenland’s many Fjords,

The race to the safety and shelter of Alexandra Fjord from the oncoming gale was blocked when we arrived early this morning to find the Fjord iced in and inaccessible. Left with no other option but to push further south toward Pim Island and Rice Straight. Arriving at Fram Haven, where Otto Sverdrup wintered in 1898-99, we found it too exposed for the expected south westerly gale. Running out of

10

Aug 2017

Lady Fortune

  Today, Wednesday August 9th at 0815 GMT -2, Exiles crossed 80 degrees latitude, stopping with Kennedy Channel in sight, Canada visible to the west and Greenland to the east, after a remarkably successful sail through the pack ice in Kane Basin along the rugged and inspiring shoreline of Ellesmere Island. The 24-hour sail through the Basin was punctuating by a stunning encounter with a polar bear snoozing blissfully on

06

Aug 2017

Into the abyss

Vladimir Putin has little in the way of “manliness” over the Exiles crew, who, after nearly two months at sea, have developed a unique and exciting arctic work out program, including “North of Arctic Circle” swimming, weight lifting with ice on the beach near Eike Glacier in Eternity Fjord, and push ups over a glacial stream at a marine accessible glacier near Qaanaaq, all under a steadfast overwatch to ensure

Reaching Upernavik was a bitter sweet moment. While it meant we were reaching the upper limits of Greenland it was also time for two of our beloved team mates to move on. Dan Carlson our visiting Scientist needed to return to Nuuk to vacation with his family and begin analyzing the data we had collected and retrieved throughout the last month. We also reluctantly dropped off our resident doctor and

19

Jul 2017

The Win

Sometimes life throws you a curve ball or two and this latest adventure has certainly been no different. Exiles have ridden out these hiccups with poise, dignity and above all a shared and terrible sense of humour. But with these curve balls every now and then also comes a win. Feeling smug with themselves after a successful stop over in Nuuk where the team had finally installed the aluminum support

12

Jul 2017

Doing Science

So what sort of data are we retrieving throughout the expedition? We have spent the last two weeks collecting data in the incredible Fjord’s of Greenland with our resident Scientist Dan Carlson. He has been collecting vertical profiles of temperature and salinity at many points along the way. He uses this data to identify water masses. Cold fresh water comes from the glaciers and mixes with ocean water in the

08

Jul 2017

Near Disaster

‘Life is 10% what happens to us and 90% how we react to it’ so I was once told by a very wise woman and these words could not have been truer than during the Exiles trip to Kobbefjord. The day had started well with a trip on the dingy to the island so that Dan could make a 3D image of it by flying the drone and the Exiles

08

Jul 2017

The Island

Today’s adventure had crewmates Will and Pete taking the dinghy to explore a deserted island in the middle of the fjord said to be the location of a Thule Inuit archeological site. Taking a few hours to hike the island and get the lay of the land, the team found a fire circle and some evidence that larger animals had been consumed not too long ago (retrieving what they thought

08

Jul 2017

Fjord Life

Exiles’ first fjord exploration after leaving Paamiut, took us to a marine terminating glacier at the heart of one of Kvane fjord’s many fingers. The glacier has been ever so slowly dropping off little bits of itself (some the size of small islands) into the fjord which then drift off and eventually find themselves in the North Atlantic and the Sea of Labrador (and which we have been making every